15 results
 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Waste audit and interview data collected by APWC in October 2019.

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Data submitted to the UN Ozone Secretariat highlighting the trend of ODS consumption (calculated as Production (if any) + imports - exports) in Tuvalu. Ozone Depleting Substances calculated here are HCFCs and Methal Bromide.

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Perceived threats can be summarised as arising from deleterious human actions and negative attitudes to the environment, leading to inappropriate behaviour, such as littering, over-fishing and hunting, using fishing nets and modern fishing method, the use of guns and the introduction of pests; the use of inappropriate technologies, such as solid and liquid waste water disposal systems; uncontrolled use of resources and control of livestock; increasing consumption patterns, arising from increases in human populations, demands and changing lifestyles; institutional weaknesses; ignorance and l

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Presenting the estimated areas of different land use/land cover types present in Tuvalu. This data was presented in both the 4th and 5th national reports to the CBD.

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu,  Tuvalu Fisheries

This data presents the value and volume of estimated fisheries catches and aquaculture harvest in the year 2014. It was presented in the 5th National Report to the Convention on Biological Diversity.

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu,  Tuvalu Fisheries

Data extracted from the 'Fisheries in the PICs' report, 2016. From the table, it can be seen that, in 2014, foreign-based offshore fishing in the Tuvalu zone produced 96,898 mt of fish, with an in-zone value of US$132 million (A$161 million).

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu,  Tuvalu Fisheries

Studies of the benefits to Pacific Island countries and territories from fisheries (“Benefish” studies) have been carried out in the past. Gillett and Lightfoot (2001) focused on the year 1999, Gillett (2009) focused on 2007, and the present study focuses on 2014.

The fishery production levels for Tuvalu from those three studies are presented in this data.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme,  Department of Environment, Tuvalu

As a developing country, Tuvalu is listed under Article 5 of the Montreal Protocol, and therefore provided with assistance to phase-out consumption of CFCs by 2010, HCFCs by 2030, and HFCs by 2024. According to Tuvalu’s 2010 National Compliance Action Strategy (NCAS) to implement the Montreal Protocol, only two types of ODS are known to have been imported into Tuvalu – CFCs and HCFCs, both in very small quantities. All consumption of these substances is through the refrigeration and air conditioning service sector (Government of Tuvalu 2010).

 

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Forest area for pacific island countries

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

marine material spillage international oceans

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This paper highlights the seriousness of the “biodiversity crisis” on atolls and the need to place greater research and conservation emphasis on atolls and other small island ecosystems. It is based on studies over the past twenty years conducted in the atolls of Tuvalu, Tokelau, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands and the Tuamotu Archipelago of French Polynesia. It stresses that atolls offer some of the greatest opportunities for integrated studies of simplified small-island ecosystems.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This list of indicators was developed through the Inform project at SPREP for use by Pacific Islands countries (PICs) to meet their national and international reporting obligations. The indicators are typically adopted by PICs for their State of Environment reports and are intended to be re-used for a range of MEA and SDG reporting targets. The indicators have been designed to be measurable and repeatable so that countries can track key aspect of environmental health over time.

 Pacific Data Hub

A recently published paper, titled “Coastal proximity of populations in 22 Pacific Island Countries and Territories” details the methodology used to undertake the analysis and presents the findings. **Purpose** * This analysis aims to estimate populations settled in coastal areas in 22 Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTS) using the data currently available. In addition to the coastal population estimates, the study compares the results obtained from the use of national population datasets (census) with those derived from the use of global population grids.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Reefs at Risk Revisited is a high-resolution update of the original global analysis, Reefs at Risk: A Map-Based Indicator of Threats to the World’s Coral Reefs. Reefs at Risk Revisited uses a global map of coral reefs at 500-m resolution, which is 64 times more detailed than the 4-km resolution map used in the 1998 analysis, and benefits from improvements in many global data sets used to evaluate threats to reefs (most threat data are at 1 km resolution, which is 16 times more detailed than those used in the 1998 analysis).

 SPREP Island and Ocean Ecosystems (IOE)

Maps and associated data from the Turtle Research and Monitoring Database System (TREDS). A summary of the database can be found below.

The Turtle Research and Monitoring Database System (TREDS) provides invaluable information for Pacific island countries and territories to manage their turtle resources. TREDS can be used to collate data from strandings, tagging, nesting, emergence and beach surveys as well as other biological data on turtles.