4 results
 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Perceived threats can be summarised as arising from deleterious human actions and negative attitudes to the environment, leading to inappropriate behaviour, such as littering, over-fishing and hunting, using fishing nets and modern fishing method, the use of guns and the introduction of pests; the use of inappropriate technologies, such as solid and liquid waste water disposal systems; uncontrolled use of resources and control of livestock; increasing consumption patterns, arising from increases in human populations, demands and changing lifestyles; institutional weaknesses; ignorance and l

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This paper highlights the seriousness of the “biodiversity crisis” on atolls and the need to place greater research and conservation emphasis on atolls and other small island ecosystems. It is based on studies over the past twenty years conducted in the atolls of Tuvalu, Tokelau, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands and the Tuamotu Archipelago of French Polynesia. It stresses that atolls offer some of the greatest opportunities for integrated studies of simplified small-island ecosystems.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This list of indicators was developed through the Inform project at SPREP for use by Pacific Islands countries (PICs) to meet their national and international reporting obligations. The indicators are typically adopted by PICs for their State of Environment reports and are intended to be re-used for a range of MEA and SDG reporting targets. The indicators have been designed to be measurable and repeatable so that countries can track key aspect of environmental health over time.

 SPREP Island and Ocean Ecosystems (IOE)

Maps and associated data from the Turtle Research and Monitoring Database System (TREDS). A summary of the database can be found below.

The Turtle Research and Monitoring Database System (TREDS) provides invaluable information for Pacific island countries and territories to manage their turtle resources. TREDS can be used to collate data from strandings, tagging, nesting, emergence and beach surveys as well as other biological data on turtles.