90 results
 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

This academic paper investigates the vulnerability of households to climatic disasters in the low-lying atoll nation of Tuvalu. Using the most recent household surveys available, the authors constructed poverty and hardship profiles for households on the different islands of Tuvalu, and combine these with geographic and topographic information to assess the exposure differentials among different groups using spatial econometric models.

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

'Story Maps' allows an individual to combine authoritative maps with narrative text, images, and multimedia content to make it easy to harness the power of maps and geography to tell a story. An insight into Tuvalu's environmental issues is featuring on the story map website with images and ArcGIS contents.

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

The map is a fundamental tool for local resident and island management. It was constructed by latest and high-resolution satellite images and the measured results of field investigation by Foram Sand Project, J-PACE and SOPAC.

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Tuvalu became the 189th member of the United Nations on September 5, 2000. This dataset provides a direct internet link to access all the highlight information pertaining to Tuvalu's participation in the UN

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

This study addresses rainfall trends, the frequency of droughts, La Niña influences and the relationship between rainfall and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in Tuvalu. The findings revealed that;

* de-trended rainfall time series show declining trends in all four rainfall stations over the period 1953-2012;

* the frequency of drought ranges from three to fourteen years with a mean of nine years

* the occurrence of drought appears to follow the La Niña years

* boplots provide an effective option for defining drought

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Jana Gheuens, Nidhi Nagabhatla and Edangodage Duminda Pradeep Perera 2019

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

McCubbin, S. G., T. Pearce, J. D. Ford, and B. Smit. 2017

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Pacific Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) Project

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Adelle Thomas, Patrick Pringle, Peter Pfleiderer and Carl-Friedrich Schleussner 2017

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

Initial Environmental Examination

Prepared by Tuvalu Electricity Corporation for the Asian Development Bank

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu

World Health Organization, 2015

 SPREP

In the 30th SPREP meeting held in September this year, the meeting supported the scaling up of environment data management in the Pacific and directed the Secretariat to initiate a process for developing a full-sized project proposal to support the scaling up environmental data management work in the region.

Later in October,  the Inform Project participating countries collectively agree on the need to scale up and extend the Inform Project services beyond 2022.

 SPREP

In the 30th SPREP meeting held in September this year, the meeting supported the scaling up of environment data management in the Pacific and directed the Secretariat to initiate a process for developing a full-sized project proposal to support the scaling up environmental data management work in the region.

Later in October,  the Inform Project participating countries collectively agree on the need to scale up and extend the Inform Project services beyond 2022.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

Greenhouse Gas Emission - Of the total 2014 emissions of 18.467 Gg CO2-e, 11.214 Gg (61%) can be attributed to the energy sector. The main GHGs emitted by Tuvalu are CO2 (60.4% of total emissions), CH4 (16.4%), and N2O (23.1%)

Trends in ODS Consumption - As a developing country, Tuvalu is listed under Article 5 of the Montreal Protocol, and therefore provided with assistance to phase-out consumption of CFCs by 2010, HCFCs by 2030, and HFCs by 2024.

 Department of Environment, Tuvalu,  Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Between 2000 and 2010, Tuvalu’s use of HCFCs increased slightly, due to the increased use of HCFC-22 in air conditioning and refrigeration equipment (Government of Tuvalu 2010). Since 2013, an annual quota system has been implemented to regulate the import of HCFCs and ensure a complete phase-out by 2030

 

Reference : Tuvalu State of Environment Report 2022

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme,  Department of Environment, Tuvalu

As a developing country, Tuvalu is listed under Article 5 of the Montreal Protocol, and therefore provided with assistance to phase-out consumption of CFCs by 2010, HCFCs by 2030, and HFCs by 2024. According to Tuvalu’s 2010 National Compliance Action Strategy (NCAS) to implement the Montreal Protocol, only two types of ODS are known to have been imported into Tuvalu – CFCs and HCFCs, both in very small quantities. All consumption of these substances is through the refrigeration and air conditioning service sector (Government of Tuvalu 2010).